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Highlights from Higher Ed: Defining Diversity, Getting Clarity and Going Online

1. Diversity is more than just SES and race

This week, Wellesley College welcomed the first transgender students it has accepted in its 147-year history. Diverse: Issues in Higher Education offers insight into how this and other colleges are recognizing and responding to an expanding definition of diversity to build classes that benefit from multiple perspectives.

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2. What’s the DACA news mean for students?

The Trump administration is ending DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, increasing the likelihood of deportation for hundreds of thousands of “Dreamers” over the next few years. What’s this mean for those working or studying in the U.S.? The Chronicle of Higher Education explores the possibilities.  

3. Let me Google that for you…

EdSurge reports that online programs spend millions each year building their brands through paid advertising, a trend that some academics find troubling. Why? A lack of information literacy: “[Advertising] doesn’t help [students] find the best-fit school. It doesn’t provide them better information to consider their options. It doesn’t promote a more thoughtful deliberation process,” shared Barnard Bull, chief innovation officer at Concordia University Wisconsin.

4. Trends in higher ed

The rise of mobile devices is spurring growth in the online education market, reports a recent report by Technavio. Demand for online courses has increased and colleges are taking advantage of this expansion opportunity by launching blended learning models. Good thing there are admissions tools available that are proven to expand applicant pools…

Recommended Reading

Higher Calling
Just as student bodies are changing, those who lead the colleges and universities at which they study are coming from more “nontraditional” paths as well. No longer is it safe to assume that the newly announced leader of the university down the street rose from faculty member to dean, then to provost before ascending to his place of leadership. This title questions if the background truly matters.

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