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Highlights from Higher Ed: Legacy Admission and Rejection

1. Still underrepresented after all these years

Many are concerned about affirmative action, because they worry that a singular focus on increasing applicants from one background decreases the representation of those from all other groups. But is this the reality? According to The NY Times, not quite. In fact, “black and Hispanic students are more underrepresented at the nation’s top colleges and universities than they were 35 years ago.”

2. Changes are coming to higher ed…finally

As an industry higher ed may not be known for its propensity to change, but if you’re paying attention, there are some key indicators that the admissions process is slowly but surely evolving. This Huffington Post article sums up five key trends in college admissions.

3. Legacy admissions in the hot seat next?

The Chronicle of Higher Education has a question: Once we’re done discussing affirmative action stacking the deck against certain pools of applicants, will we shift our focus to policies that “rig” the system against disadvantaged students?

4. Rejected, but why?

There are many reasons that college applications get rejected, from there being too much interest for the number of seats available to the quality of the submitted materials leaving something to be desired. This U.S. News & World Report article offers some insight into six common reasons for rejection — and also inspires some thought about how a Centralized Application Service (CAS™) can help address them.

Recommended Reading

The New Education: How to Revolutionize the University to Prepare Students for a World in Flux
In our constantly changing world, creativity, collaboration and adaptability are key, but they surprisingly don’t have a place in many colleges and universities. In this title, a leader in higher education reform explores the changes that higher ed needs to make to better serve this and future generations of students.

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