The Friday 4 at 4: Going Social, the Power of Context and the Gender Wage Gap

1. You’re active, but are they engaged?

Schools know that they need to be on all the most popular platforms — Facebook, Twitter, even Snapchat — but are prospective students actually engaged? In this article, Inside Higher Ed explores why going social is just half the battle and provides solid suggestions around things to consider if the effort is there but the engagement is lacking.

2. Context saves the day for low-income students.

Access — it’s the why of what we do at Liaison, making this article from MarketWatch a must read. In it, they explore a study that found applications coming from low-income students may not come with enough context to communicate the magnitude of the applicant’s success, a problem when you consider the value of building a class full of diverse perspectives and unique successes.

3. Full-time FTW.

The most expensive college degree? The one that you don’t have, according to former secretary of education John King. This article in Diverse: Issues in Higher Education explores results of a study that found full-time community college students are more likely to graduate than their part-time counterparts. This one’s particularly interesting as higher education moves — at a slow pace, but it’s headed there — towards a more flexible model that meets students where they are with digital offerings and on-demand courses.

4. College degreed, yet still taking home cents on the dollar…

On average, women are paid less than men at every education level. Listen in during this Minnesota Public Radio interview to hear more about how even a college education isn’t helping to close the wage gap.

Recommended Reading

The Shape of the River: Long-term Consequences of Considering Race in College and University Admissions
Do they have a copy at your local library? WorldCat will tell you.

Affirmative action — it’s a hot topic in admissions. Pick it up if you want to hear more about race-sensitive admissions policies and their effects on students and society as a whole.

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